Badjao in the Philippines

Clearly, I underestimated the watercolor medium. At first I thought it was too simple to do, mixing them in the plate, adding some water, letting the brush absorb the colors, and laying it on special paper to give it that signature look.

But no. One of my attempts gave me a massive headache as I tried painting the Badjao in the Philippines, the sea gypsies in Cebu, for that matter.

This piece was made with less strokes using the tip of the brush and more of blotting as I wanted to get the colors right. I feel like I’m back in my childhood years, re-learning the craft (obviously) through trial and error.

Unfinished facial elements (which I tend to avoid).

Unfinished facial elements (which I tend to avoid).

It’s funny that during this time, every tutorial is readily available in the internet and all it takes is for me to search for it and practice the fundamentals. Somehow, I wanted to. But then again, it is very liberating to actually “fail” or commit mistakes during practices or “creative sessions” because from there, I can correct myself and find another way to make it right.

The whole process of doing these practice works is solely for the purpose of getting that “feel” of the medium (so rare, so new to me). I believe that through experiments, wacky brush strokes or even mistakes, could help a lot in giving an artist his or her unique style.

Right now, I am still slowly developing that style (one awesome or failed artwork at a time).

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2 Comments

  1. Paula October 14, 2014

    I think I have also a hidden talent like yours. (lol)
    Hindi lang na-develop.

    Kaya when I see artists’ stuff, I’m so wishing I could draw/paint just like that.

    Keep it up rubber sister. And kumusta na si manliligaw? hehehe!

    :-)

    • reginegarcia October 15, 2014 — Post Author

      Hi Rubber Sister! Thank you. I believe it is innate naman sa lahat yung gift of art kaso lang it just needs to be nurtured :) So, you better practice! :) See you soon!

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